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Please submit items to the Calendar of Events by noon Thursday of each week, via e-mail, at calendar@ashevilledailyplanet.com, or fax to 252-6567, or mail c/o The Daily Planet, P.O. Box 8490, Asheville, N.C. 28814-8490. Submissions will be accepted and printed at the discretion of the editor, space permitting. To place an ad for an event, call 252-6565.
Calendar of Events

Wednesday, Feb. 4

CLIMATE CHANGE BUSINESS PROGRAM, 7 p.m., Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville. Former Asheville City Councilwoman Robin Cape will present a program, “Using Climate Data to Create Business Opportunities: The Collider.” She invites attendees to learn about a business and learning center in development in downtown Asheville that brings climate data into decision-making. Cape envisions the center attracting business entrepreneurs, artists, climatologists and data experts to work together and deal with the challenges of climate change.

OPEN REHEARSAL, 7 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The Blue Ridge Orchestra will hold an open rehearsal. The community orchestra is directed by Milton Crotts. Admission is free and open to the public.

SOCIAL JUSTICE SPEAKER, 7:30 p.m., Moore Auditorium, Mars Hill University, Mars Hill. The Rev. William Barber, a leader of the Moral Monday protest movement and president of the North Carolina conference of the NAACP, will speak on civil rights and social justice issues. Admission is free and open to the public.



Thursday, Feb. 5

PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT RECEPTION, 5-7:30 p.m., Laurel Forum, Karpel Hall, UNC Asheville.The opening reception for the exhibit “Selma to Montgomery 1965” will include a talk by James Barker, the exhibit’s photographer. The exhibit will be on display in Karpen Hall Lobby through Feb. 27. Admission is free and open to the public. 

DISCUSSION COURSE, 6-7:30 p.m., Battery Park Book Exchange & Champagne Bar, downtown Asheville. MountainTrue’s annual NWEI discussion course, “Seeing Systems: Peace, Justice & Sustainability,” will be held every Thursday through March 19. The course is intended to address the connections among three of society’s most pressing challenges, equipping attendees to promote peace, justice and sustainability within the community.




Friday, Feb. 6

BLACK HISTORY LECTURE, 9:30 a.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. “The Grimke Sisters: Abolitionist Activists,” a lecture by Catherine Frank, executive director of OLLI, and Jim Lenburg, professor of history and humanities, will be presented as part of OLLI’s Black History Month programming. Admission is free and open to the public.

COLD WAR LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Humanities Lecture Hall, UNC Asheville. “Cold War and Its Legacy” will be addressed by Sarah Judson, associate professor of history. Admission is free and open to the public. 

ROMANTICISM LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Lipinsky Auditorium, UNC Asheville. “1848: Romanticism and its Discontents” will be addressed by John McClain, humanities lecturer. Admission is free and open to the public. 

BLACK WOMAN’S VIEW OF UNCA, 11:30 a.m., 102-A Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The Fab Friday lecture series will present “An African-American Woman’s Perspective on UNC Asheville” as part of UNCA’s Black History Month. Dr. Dee James will share her journey at UNCA as an African-American student then faculty member. She is a tenured professor in UNCA’s literature department. The presentation is free and open to the public.





Friday, Feb. 6

NINA SIMONE TRIBUTE SHOW, 8 p.m., Tryon Fine Arts Center, Tryon. Award-winning singer Natalie Douglas will perform in the show, “To Nina: A Tribute to Nina Simone.” The show, which earned rave reviews in New York and London, is billed as bringing back “the power of Nina Simone with passion, nuance, fierce intelligence and her own infectious personality.” The show also tells Simone’s “history.” For tickets, call 859-8322 or visit www.tryonarts.org.





Saturday, Feb. 7

CHOCOLATE SUSTAINABILITY TOUR, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., French Broad Chocolate Factory, 21 Buxton Ave., Asheville. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, French Broad Chocolates is giving MountainTrue a peak into the sustainable initiatives of their chocolate factory. A tasting is included. A maximum of 12 participants will be accepted. Admission is free, but registration required by contacting Rachel Stevens at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . 

UMPHREY’S McGEE CONCERT, 8 p.m., U.S. Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. Progressive rock band Umphrey’s McGee will perform in concert. For tickets, which are $30 in advance and $35 on the day of the show, visit www.ticketmaster.com, or call (800) 745-3000.




Monday, Feb. 9

LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Humanities Lecture Hall, UNC Asheville. “Medieval India” will be addressed by Keya Maitra, chair and associate professor of philosophy. Admission is free and open to the public.

TRANSITION ASHEVILLE TALK, 6:30-8 p.m., St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Charlotte Street, Asheville. Vaidila Satvika, formerly the director of the New York City Plaza Program, will discuss the radical approach that is leading NYC to take back underutilized streets to make more space for people. In the densest city in the U.S., leaders are demolishing streets to build places for people to sit, for children to play, and for plants to grow. The talk will answer the following questions: How is this possible? What lessons can we learn? And what is causing cities everywhere to think more seriously about the transportation paradigm?

MOVE TO AMEND MEETING, 7 p.m., North Asheville Library, Asheville. Move to Amend Buncombe County will review and finalize 2015 goals, review job descriptions and discuss membership clarifications.




Tuesday, Feb. 10

OBJECTIVISTS’ MEETING, 6 p.m., North Asheville Library Meeting Room, 1030 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Attendees are invited to celebrate Ayn Rand, her philosophy of Objectivism and the prime value – life. Admission to the meeting is free.

DIALOGUES ON RACE, 6:30 p.m, Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Swannanoa Valley, 500 Montreat Rd., Black Mountain. Two local churches — Thomas Chapel AME Zion Church  and the UUCSV, have joined forces to offer a four-week series of “Community Dialogues on Race,” beginning Feb. 10. The two-hour programs will feature films, group exercises, and dialogue, facilitated by the Rev. Michael J.S. Carter of the UUCSV. The program is free and open to everyone. Interested persons are encouraged to register by emailing Roberta Madden at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . 

LIBERTARIAN MEETING, 7 p.m., Oakleaf Furniture, 130 Miller St., downtown Waynesville. The Haywood County Libertarian Party meets on the second Tuesday of the month. Open discussion and debate are encouraged with all perspectives and persuasions welcomed, regardless of political or religious affiliation.


ADDRESS ON BRAZIL, 7:30 p.m., Manheimer Room, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The World Affairs Council Great Decisions Lecture 2015 series will feature an address on “Brazil’s Metamorphosis,” featuring speaker Liliana Castro of Buncombe County Schools.




Wednesday, Feb. 11

OPEN REHEARSAL, 7 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The Blue Ridge Orchestra will hold an open rehearsal. The community orchestra is directed by Milton Crotts. Admission is free and open to the public.






Friday, Feb. 13

POLICING/MINORITY COMMUNITIES’ TALK, 9:30 a.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. Buncombe County Sheriff Van Duncan will address “Policing and Minority Communities” as part of OLLI’s Black History Month programming. Admission is free and open to the public.

LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Lipinsky Auditorium, UNC Asheville. “The Contagion of Freedom: Anti-Slavery, Women’s Rights, and Economic Justice” will be addressed by Sarah Judson, associate professor of history and Africana studies. Admission is free and open to the public.

LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Humanities Lecture, UNC Asheville. “Human Rights & Global Justice” will be addressed by Grace Campbell, humanities lecturer. Admission is free and open to the public.

“NEUROLOGYOF AGING” TALK, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The Fab Friday series will feature a talk on “Neurology of Aging,” with Dr. James Patton, founding member of Asheville Neurology Specialists. The presentation will focus on the age-related changes in the nervous system, such as a decline in cognitive function as well as changes in cranial nerve function and in the motor system. Admission is free and open to the public.

SYMPHONY TALK, 3 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. A symphony talk will feature Daniel Meyer, music director of the Asheville Symphony Orchestra. Meyer will discuss the symphony’s next concert. Admissionis free and open to the public.

ANTI-VALENTINE’S DAY PILLOW FIGHT, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Pritchard Park, 67 Patton Ave., downtown Asheville. The annual Anti-Valentine’s Day Pillow Fight will be held. All are welcome, but no feather pillows are allowed and participants are urged to remove their glasses. Admission is free.

SING-ALONG, 6:30 p.m., The Forum, Diana Wortham Theatre, downtown Asheville. “Sing Together: Freedom Songs & Spirituals” will celebrate the joy of music and singing in a spirited session with musicians Beth and Jim Magill — and special guest Becky Stone. All skill levels are welcome and no experience is required. For tickets, which are $10 for adults, $8 for children 12 and under and free for children 2 and under, visit www.dwtheatre.com, or call 257-4530.

SOCIAL JUSTICE FILM NIGHT, 7 p.m., Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville. Shot over a period of four years, “Girl Trouble” documents the compelling personal stories of three teenage girls entangled in San Francisco’s failing juvenile justice system. Admission is open to the public and free, but donations are welcome.

FRANKIE AVALON CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts, 1028 Georgia Rd., Franklin. Singer-actor Frankie Avalon will perform in concert. Avalon has had a career that spans three generations of music, television and films, including an iconic cameo as the Teen Angel in the film musical, “Grease.” With a long string of million-selling singles and albums, Avalon’s music became one of the defining sounds of pre-Beatles pop music. He was honored with an induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. For tickets, call 524-1598, or visit GreatMountainMusic.com.

“DEATH AND THE MAIDEN” PRODUCTION, 7:30 p.m., The Feichter Studio, HART Theatre, Waynesivlle. A production of “Death and the Maiden” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 13 and 14 and at 3 p.m. Feb. 15. For tickes, which are $10 for adults and $6 for students, visit www.harttheatre.com, or call 456-6322.

ARLO GUTHRIE CONCERT, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, downtown Asheville. Arlo Guthrie will perform in his 50th anniversary “Alice’s Restaurant” Tour concert. The show also will be presented at the same time and location on Feb. 14.




Sunday, Feb. 15

ETHICAL SOCIETY PROGRAM, 2-3:30 p.m., The Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood Road, Asheville. An address on “Growing up African-American in Segregated Asheville” will be presented by Viola Spells, owner of Zenobia Studio, at the meeting of the Ethical Humanist Society of Asheville. Spells will discuss her experiences from birth through high school (1945-1963), including vignettes of the YWCA, churches, schools, library, the YMI, Lexington Avenue, key people who were positive influences on children and young adults, community life in Asheville during the 1940s and 1950s, Asheville Student Committee on Racial Equality (ASCORE) in the early 1960s and desegregation of the Asheville public library. 




Sunday, Feb. 15

LECTURE/PERFORMANCES, 3 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. “Inside the Music” will be addressed by Melodie Galloway, aartistic director of Asheville Choral Society as well as chair and associate professor of music at UNCA. Galloway will give an inside look into the choral performance, a sneak peek at the upcoming ACS season and will bring a feature vocalist to the stage.




Monday, Feb. 16

LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Humanities Lecture Hall, UNC Asheville. “African Cultural Spheres” will be addressed by John Wood, professor of sociology, and Agya Boakye-Boaten, director and assistant professor of Africana studies. Admission is free and open to the public.

LECTURE,  6 p.m., Laurel Forum, Karpen Hall, UNC Asheville. “Projecting the Urban: Humanists and Designers in Collaboration” will be addressed by Dana Cuff, founding director of cityLAB, a research center that explores the challenges facing the 21st century metropolis through design and research. Admission is free and open to the public.



Tuesday, Feb. 17

RINGO STARR CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., PeaceCenter, 300 S. Main St., Greenville, S.C. Ringo Starr will perform with his All Starr Band, which includes Steve Lukather, Richard Page, Gregg Rolie, Todd Rundgren, Gregg Bissonette and Warren Ham. VIP tickets, which include premium seating, a tour shirt and other commemorative items, are $250. For general admission tickets, which are $85 to $125, call (864) 467-3000 or (800) 888-7768, or visit www.peacecenter.org.

“PRIVACY IN THE DIGITAL AGE” ADDRESS, 7:30 p.m., Manheimer Room, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The World Affairs Council Great Decisions Lecture 2015 series will offer an address on  “Privacy in the Digital Age,” featuring speaker Jagdeep Bhandari of Mars Hill University.



Wednesday, Feb. 18

OPEN REHEARSAL, 7 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The Blue Ridge Orchestra will hold an open rehearsal. The community orchestra is directed by Milton Crotts. Admission is free and open to the public.





Thursday, Feb. 19

“SAVE THE ROSENWALD SCHOOL” PROGRAM, 6:30 p.m., Broyhill Chapel, Mars Hill University, Mars Hill. The final program of “Our Story – This Place” will feature an evening of gospel music and a presentation on the history of gospel music and how it relates to the African-American community. A reception will be held afterwards. Upon rehabilitation, the Mars Hill Anderson Rosenwald School will serve as a community cultural center and an interpretive museum intended to promote a fuller understanding of southern Appalachian black history and to enhance education at all levels. “Our Story, This Place, The History of African American Education in Madison County, NC: The Mars Hill Anderson Rosenwald School” is on display at the Rural Heritage Museum until Feb.28. The exhibit includes historic artifacts, photographs and videos. Works by Charity Ray are also on display as part of the exhibit. The Rural Heritage Museum is open daily (except Mondays) from 1 to 5 p.m. and by appointment. It is located on Rt. 213, in Montague Hall, on the MHU campus. Admission is free.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH LECTURE, 7 p.m., Lipinsky Auditorium, UNC Asheville. Lecturer Henry Louis Gates Jr. will discuss “Geneology, Genetics and African American History” in UNCA’s Black History Month Lecture. He is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor at Harvard University as well as director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. His 10-part documentary series, “Finding Your Roots,” aired on PBS in 2012. Gates is editor-in-chief of TheRoot.com. He is the author of several works of literary criticism focusing on race and black culture, and he has written for Time, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and The Root. He has also produced and hosted several documentaries for PBS.




Friday, Feb. 20

HISTORY OF SLAVERY IN ASHEVILLE LECTURE, 9:30 a.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. A lecture, “History of Slavery in Asheville,” will be presented by Deborah Miles, director of UNCA’s Center for Diversity Education. The lecture is free and open to the public. 

LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Humanities Lecture Hall, UNC Asheville. “Africa in the Modern World” will be addressed by Dwight Mullen, professor of political science. Admission is free and open to the public. 





Friday, Feb. 20

LECTURE, 1:30 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The Fab Friday series will feature an address on “The New Renaissance in Florence, Italy,” by Mark Gordon Smith, author of three books about Italy and “Travels Across Italy” blog.

Opera Talks, 3 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. Asheville Lyric Opera Director David Craig Starkey and a cast of industry professionals will guide the audience through their operatic world.




Saturday, Feb. 21

HEART CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Resort, Cherokee. Heart, founded by sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson four decades ago, will perform in concert. The rock band has sold more than 35 million records worldwide, and is best-known for songs “Barracuda,” “Magic Man,” “Crazy on You,” and “Alone.” For tickets, which are $42 to 62, visit www.ticketmaster.com, or call (800) 745-3000.

“RHAPSODY IN BLUEGRASS” CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., The Foundation Performing Arts Center, Isothermal Community College, Spindale. The Annie Moses Band will present “Rhapsody in Bluegrass,” billed as “a panoramic exploration of America and her music.” The band is a Julliard-trained ensemble of six instrumentalists and vocalists whose performances feature a variety of strings, keyboards and rhythm. For tickets, which are $19 and $24, call 286-9990, or visit www.FoundationShows.org.

THE THREE DAVIDS CONCERT, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, Pack Place, 12 Biltmore Ave., downtown Asheville. Performing in concert will be three of Asheville’s award-winning songwriters and entertainers: David Holt, David Wilcox and David LaMotte. For tickets, which are $35 for adults and $25 for students and children under 12, visit www.dwtheatre.com, or call 257-4530.




Sunday, Feb. 22

READING, 3 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. A reading by Ronald Manheimer, author of “Mirrors of the Mind,” will be offered.





Monday, Feb. 23

Lecture, 11:25 a.m., Humanities Lecture Hall, UNC Asheville. “Gender and Sexuality in Medieval Europe” will be addressed by Sophie Mills, National Endowment for the Humanities Distinguished Professor of Classics.





Tuesday, Feb. 24

“Russia and the Near Abroad” SPEECH, 7:30 p.m., Manheimer Room, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The World Affairs Council Great Decisions Lecture 2015 series will feature an address on  “Russia and the Near Abroad,” featuring speaker Steve Solnick of Warren Wilson College.





Wednesday, Feb. 25

OPEN REHEARSAL, 7 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The Blue Ridge Orchestra will hold an open rehearsal. The community orchestra is directed by Milton Crotts. Admission is free.




Friday, Feb. 27

LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Lipinsky Auditorium, UNC Asheville.“Islam and the Modern World: From the Ottoman Empire to the Rise of the Republic of Turkey” will be addressed by Rodger Payne, chair and associate professor of religious studies. Admission is free and open to the public.

LECTURE, 11:25 a.m., Humanities Lecture Hall, UNC Asheville. “Black Protest Thought in the Era of the Post World War II Black Freedom Struggle” will be addressed by Sarah Judson, associate professor of history and Africana studies. Admission is free and open to the public.

SOLAS CONCERT, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, downtown Asheville. The Irish-American musical group Solas will perform in concert. For tickets, visit www.dwtheatre.com, or call 257-4530.

“SLAVE GIRL” PERFORMANCE, 8 p.m., The Forum, Diana Wortham Theatre, downtown Asheville. Hailed as the most important narrative of its time depicting the life of a female slave, Harriet Jacobs’ true story is billed as “brilliantly dramatized” by Cherita Armstrong, a star of stage and screen. The show also will be performed at the same time and location on Feb. 28. For tickets, visit www.dwtheatre.com, or call 257-4530.




Saturday, Feb. 28

WILLIE NELSON CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Resort, Cherokee. Country singer Willie Nelson will perform in concert. For tickets, which are $53 to $85, visit www.Ticketmaster.com or call (800) 745-3000.

“MAN 1, BANK 0” COMEDY SHOW, 7:30 p.m., John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee. The comedy show “Man 1, Bank 0” will be performed. Patrick Combs will tell the true story of a man who deposited a junk-mail check labeled “non-negotiable” into a bank account, only to see things erupt into an adventure pitting a “David” regular guy against the “Goliath” of the banking industry. For tickets, which are $21, call 227-2479, or visit http://bardoartscenmter.wcu.edu.

SWANNANOA VALLEY MLK BREAKFAST, 9-11 a.m., Dorothy Walls Camp, 495 Cragmont Road, Black Mountain. Swannanoa Valley MLK Breakfast Committee will feature Tyrone Greenlee as the keynote speaker at the Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast. Tickets are $15 for adults and $6 for children.




Tuesday, March 10

GARRISON KEILLOR SHOW, 7:30 p.m., Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, U.S. Cellular Center, downtown Asheville. Garrison Keillor will perform in concert. Keillor, a bestselling author and host of NPR’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” delivers “hilarious anecdotes about growing up in the American Midwest — and the aging process... not to mention ‘late-life fatherhood,’” a press release noted. “With a wonderful, dry sense of humor, he captivates audiences and delivers with class, charisma and humor.” Keillor has received numerous awards, including a Grammy Award for his recording of “Lake Wobegon Days.” Tickets, which are available at the U.S. Cellular Center Box Office or by calling (800) 745-3000, also may be ordered by visiting www.ticketmaster.com.

“Sectarianism in the Middle East” ADDRESS, 7:30 p.m., Manheimer Room, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The World Affairs Council Great Decisions lecture series will offer an address on  “Sectarianism in the Middle East,” featuring speaker David Hudleson of National Security.




Friday, March 13

STYX CONCERT, 9 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Resort, Cherokee. The band Styx will perform in concert. Styx, a rock band from Chicago, became famous for its albums from the mid-1970s and early 1980s. For tickets, which range from $37 to $69.50, visit www.ticketmaster.com, or call (800) 745-3000.




Saturday, March 21

RODNEY CARRINGTON CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Resort, Cherokee. Rodney Carrington will perform in his “Here Comes the Truth” show. For tickets, which are $$64 to $297 visit www.Ticketmaster.com or call (800) 745-3000. 




Saturday, April 11

LORETTA LYNN CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Resort, Cherokee. Loretta Lynn will perform in her “Here Comes the Truth” show. For tickets, which are $41 to $259, visit www.Ticketmaster.com or call (800) 745-3000.




Sunday, April 19

David Sedaris SHOW, 3 p.m., Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, U.S. Cellular Center, downtown Asheville. New York Times bestselling author David Sedaris will visit Asheville for an afternoon of what are billed as engaging recollections and readings. He is the author of the bestsellers “Naked,” “When You Are Engulfed in Flames,” “Me Talk Pretty One Day” and “Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim.” Sedaris also is a regular National Public Radio contributor. For tickets, which are $33 to $50, visit www.ticketmaster.com.




Saturday, May 2

CALEB JOHNSON CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Resort, Cherokee. Asheville’s Caleb Johnson, who won last year’s televised “American Idol” competition series, will perform in concert. For tickets, which are $42 to $64, visit www.ticketmaster.com, or call (800) 745-3000. 
Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 February 2015 23:46
 



 


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